Melissa Hinkley

Melissa Hinkley

Getting the right nutrition is one of the key ingredients to optimal athletic performance. Learn how you can help your child be an even greater athlete through improved eating choices. To register and pay for the November 30th seminar - 

click the link below and add the Sports Nutrition bundle to your cart:

https://app.acuityscheduling.com/catalog.php?owner=12898707

The number one reason that women stop exercising during pregnancy is they feel like it could be harmful to both baby and mom. They say there could be a lack of blood flow and oxygen supply to the baby, ligaments become lax and too unstable to train, it can effect the amount of nutrition to the baby, body temperature is elevated to an unsafe level, or there is too much mechanical stress to sustain. This has been a long held belief by many women, and it’s pretty similar to the myth that strength training for youth athletes is harmful too. At 1RM, we have written articles based on science and practical application that youth strength training is perfectly safe and actually beneficial for athletes. In this post, we will show that science also supports training during pregnancy.

Do a simple google search on training during pregnancy, and you aren’t going to find a lot of substantial material. Sure, you will find plenty of articles telling you to walk or do yoga during pregnancy, but you will be hard-pressed to find articles on actually training during pregnancy. We are a sports performance gym; we focus on performance. We're going to walk through training during pregnancy and how you can legitimately train with "a bun in the oven". And by train, I mean lift heavy, play sports, go hiking, and stay strong. This article won't get into the detailed science and research on the physiologicial response to exercise when pregnant, but stay tuned for that article. 

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Gym photos

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Knee pain sucks. It's annoying, it can impair performance, and can be debilitating at times. At 1RM, we are seeing and hearing about tons of high school athletes who are suffering from chronic knee pain. It goes under the disguise of many names; some call it Anterior knee pain, others Patellofemoral pain syndrome, and still others know it as Jumper's knee. It's a tricky one to deal with, but we have some tips that can hopefully decrease your pain.

Muscle soreness results from mechanical damage to the muscle and biomechanical changes within muscle tissue. It's characterized by inflammation, pain, swelling, soreness, stiffness, and markers of muscle damage such as Creatine Kinase (CK) and Lactase Dehydrogenase (LDH). (NSCA)

(Bobby and one of his athetes repping our new T's.)

Increasing upper body power comes down to 3 things: overall strength, power production, and movement speed.   

Evaluating an athlete is much more than just testing their vertical and pro-agility. At 1RM Performance, we have a very detailed way of evaluating our athletes. In 1 hour, we can figure out if an athlete has imbalances, mobility issues, strength issues, power issues or speed issues. Is it the best way of judging an athletes's abilities? I can't say 100% yes, but we have figured out a pretty sweet way to take our athletes to the next level and have concrete numbers to show their gains. 

As a volleyball player, how do you actually hit the ball harder? It's a great question and actually is more difficult to answer then I expected. I was asked this question by one of the best, most technical volleyball coaches in San Diego. His thought was that if we increased core strength, then our volleyball athletes would hit harder. However, we are going to take a look at how core stability plays a role in hitting harder. 

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Rotator cuff - quick and easy

The rotator cuff has a very important role – to keep your arm attached to your body. The 4 muscles of the rotator cuff originate on the scapula (see below) and insert on the humerus and keep the head of the humerus centered in the glenoid fossa. Think of the head of the humerus as a golf ball, and the glenoid fossa as the tee.

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