• We Offer Blending Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization & Strength and Conditioning

    We Offer Blending Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization & Strength and Conditioning

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Should Baseball Players Bench Press

Should Baseball Players Bench?

The classic question of whether or not baseball players should bench; I hear this question at least twice a week. My answer: yes and no.  The answer is neither yes or no because there are a lot of people in this world (baseball, overhead athlete, non sport athletes…) that honestly shouldn’t bench. Why? because they don’t know to bench PROPERLY. I will go out on a limb and say anyone that doesn’t know how to bench shouldn’t bench, and anyone that knows how to bench properly should. Follow along as I lay to rest all the claims made against baseball players and benching. IMG_1243_1.jpg

Published in 1RMPerformance Blog

San Diego Baseball Performance and DNS

San Diego baseball is dominant. As a strength coach that works with baseball players that play year round, and at a high level, I must be able to keep my players healthy. That means it is mandatory for my baseball players to maintain proper movement and joint “centration” (joint position allowing maximal transfer of forces and efficient of movement). I can watch most pitchers and baseball players on the diamond, and pretty accurately diagnose where they are suffering pain. It has actually become a game with new clients. Knowing more detail about their pain than they tell me, and 99% of the time being right. What’s cooler than that is being able to eliminate the pain during movement sometimes instantly. It’s not magic; it’s Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS).

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Published in 1RMPerformance Blog
Monday, July 9, 2012

Saving Your Shoulder

A quick guide to a healthier shoulder

Rarely a week goes by when I don't hear someone complaining about shoulder pain or see someone massaging a sore bicep tendon. I see it all the time in youth baseball/softball players, but also frequently in recreational athletes including volleyball players, surfers, and weight-lifters. It wasn’t until I got a text from a friend last week explaining that his shoulder even bothers him when he plays guitar that I had my eureka moment. Most San Diegans suffer from the curse of underdeveloped external rotators, and overdeveloped internal rotators!

Published in 1RMPerformance Blog

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